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The cancer pain experience of Israeli and American patients 65 years and older

In Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
By: Cohen, MZ.
Contributor(s): Maya, G | Mendoza | Tito, R | Munsell, MS | Mark, F | Musgrave, R | Catherine F | Catherine F | .
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Vol 30 Issues 3.Publisher: 2005Description: 254-263.Subject(s): sense of coherence | older adults | culture | Cancer pain | DDC classification: In: Journal of Pain and Symptom ManagementSummary: With the aging of the worlds population, cancer pain will become an increasingly important health issue. The purpose of this study was to describe the cancer pain experience of Americans (n = 60) and Israelis (n = 39) 65 years and older. Outpatients in teaching hospitals in the U.S. and in Israel completed study questionnaires. Thirty percent of the total variance of worst pain was explained by age, symptom severity, and cancer stage, and 40% of the total variance of pain interference was explained by whether they were American or Israeli, symptom severity, and sense of coherence. Israeli patients had significantly higher scores on worst pain and pain interference, and significantly lower pain management index (PMI) and knowledge and attitudes toward pain and pain control scores. Studies with larger samples and across different cultures are needed to confirm these findings in order to develop culturally appropriate interventions.
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With the aging of the worlds population, cancer pain will become an increasingly important health issue. The purpose of this study was to describe the cancer pain experience of Americans (n = 60) and Israelis (n = 39) 65 years and older. Outpatients in teaching hospitals in the U.S. and in Israel completed study questionnaires. Thirty percent of the total variance of worst pain was explained by age, symptom severity, and cancer stage, and 40% of the total variance of pain interference was explained by whether they were American or Israeli, symptom severity, and sense of coherence. Israeli patients had significantly higher scores on worst pain and pain interference, and significantly lower pain management index (PMI) and knowledge and attitudes toward pain and pain control scores. Studies with larger samples and across different cultures are needed to confirm these findings in order to develop culturally appropriate interventions.

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