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Molecular classification of breast cancer: implications for selection of adjuvant chemotherapy

In Nature Clinical Practice Oncology
By: Andre F.
Contributor(s): Pusztai, Lajos | .
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Vol 3 Issues 11.Publisher: 2006Description: 621-632.Subject(s): chemotherapy, classifier, estrogen receptor, predictive, prognostic | DDC classification: In: Nature Clinical Practice OncologySummary: Adjuvant chemotherapy improves survival of patients with stage IIII breast cancer but it is being increasingly recognized that the benefit is not equal for all patients. Molecular characteristics of the cancer affect sensitivity to chemotherapy. In general, estrogen-receptor-negative disease is more sensitive to chemotherapy than estrogren-receptor-positive disease. Large-scale genomic analyses of breast cancer suggest that further molecular subsets may exist within the categories defined by hormone receptor status. It is hoped that the new molecular classification schemes might improve patient selection for therapy. Before any new molecular classification (or predictive test) is adopted for routine clinical use, however, several criteria need to be met. There must be an agreed and reproducible method by which to assign molecular class to a new case. Cancers that belong to different molecular classes must show differences in disease outcome and treatment efficacy that affect management and treatment select
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Adjuvant chemotherapy improves survival of patients with stage IIII breast cancer but it is being increasingly recognized that the benefit is not equal for all patients. Molecular characteristics of the cancer affect sensitivity to chemotherapy. In general, estrogen-receptor-negative disease is more sensitive to chemotherapy than estrogren-receptor-positive disease. Large-scale genomic analyses of breast cancer suggest that further molecular subsets may exist within the categories defined by hormone receptor status. It is hoped that the new molecular classification schemes might improve patient selection for therapy. Before any new molecular classification (or predictive test) is adopted for routine clinical use, however, several criteria need to be met. There must be an agreed and reproducible method by which to assign molecular class to a new case. Cancers that belong to different molecular classes must show differences in disease outcome and treatment efficacy that affect management and treatment select

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