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Neurolytic celiac plexus block: better alternative to opioid treatment in upper abdominal malignancies: Indian experience

In Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy
By: Jain PN.
Contributor(s): Sareen R | Myatra SN | Shrikhande SV | pnj5@hotmail.com or pnj1@vsnl.com.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Vol 19 Issues 3.Publisher: 2005Description: 15-20.Subject(s): quality of life | cancer pain | opioid consumption | Neurolytic celiac plexus block | DDC classification: In: Journal of Pain and Palliative Care PharmacotherapySummary: The majority of patients with advanced upper abdominal malignancies suffer from moderate to severe pain due to unavailability of morphine in developing world. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of neurolytic celiac plexus block on pain and quality of life in this patient subpopulation. One hundred consecutive patients receiving opioids for their pain relief were divided in two groups. Group I (control) patients received oral morphine & NSAIDS and group II (study) patients underwent neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) to compare their effects on pain relief, morphine consumption, quality of life (QOL), Karnofsky and performance scores up to one month. NCPB provided statistically significant better pain relief and reduced morphine consumption at one month (P = 0.000). Superior Karnofsky and performance scores also favored NCPB group (P = 0.000); however the difference in overall QOL was not statistically significant (P = 0.24). Patients in oral morphine group had more side effects (94% vs. 58%)
List(s) this item appears in: Jain PN
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The majority of patients with advanced upper abdominal malignancies suffer from moderate to severe pain due to unavailability of morphine in developing world. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of neurolytic celiac plexus block on pain and quality of life in this patient subpopulation. One hundred consecutive patients receiving opioids for their pain relief were divided in two groups. Group I (control) patients received oral morphine & NSAIDS and group II (study) patients underwent neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) to compare their effects on pain relief, morphine consumption, quality of life (QOL), Karnofsky and performance scores up to one month. NCPB provided statistically significant better pain relief and reduced morphine consumption at one month (P = 0.000). Superior Karnofsky and performance scores also favored NCPB group (P = 0.000); however the difference in overall QOL was not statistically significant (P = 0.24). Patients in oral morphine group had more side effects (94% vs. 58%)

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