Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Antiemetics: an update and the MASCC guidelines applied in clinical practice

In Nature Clinical Practice Oncology
Contributor(s): herrstedt@dadlnet.dk | Herrstedt J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Vol 5 Issues 1.Publisher: 2008Description: 32-43.Subject(s): serotonin antagonists | neurokinin antagonists | chemotherapy | antiemetics | DDC classification: In: Nature Clinical Practice OncologySummary: Nausea and vomiting are two of the most severe problems for patients treated with chemotherapy. Until the late 1970s, nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy was an almost neglected research area. With the introduction of cisplatin, the cytotoxin with the highest emetic potential, research was stimulated and has now resulted in the development of two new classes of antiemetics, the serotonin and neurokinin antagonists. A large number of trials have fine-tuned antiemetic therapy and made evidence-based recommendations possible for the majority of patients receiving chemotherapy. This Review discusses the pathophysiology of nausea and vomiting, the development of antiemetics, highlights some of the newest antiemetics, and finally summarizes recommendations from the evidence-based guidelines developed by the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Add tag(s)
Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Articles Articles Tata Memorial Hospital
(Browse shelf) Available AR3178

Nausea and vomiting are two of the most severe problems for patients treated with chemotherapy. Until the late 1970s, nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy was an almost neglected research area. With the introduction of cisplatin, the cytotoxin with the highest emetic potential, research was stimulated and has now resulted in the development of two new classes of antiemetics, the serotonin and neurokinin antagonists. A large number of trials have fine-tuned antiemetic therapy and made evidence-based recommendations possible for the majority of patients receiving chemotherapy. This Review discusses the pathophysiology of nausea and vomiting, the development of antiemetics, highlights some of the newest antiemetics, and finally summarizes recommendations from the evidence-based guidelines developed by the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha