Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Vocal fold paresis and paralysis: what the thyroid surgeon should know

In Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
Contributor(s): Sataloff RT | rubinad@sbcglobal.net | Rubin AD.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Vol 17 Issues 1.Publisher: 2008Description: 175-196.Subject(s): Thyroid | Paralysis | Vocal Fold Paresis | DDC classification: In: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North AmericaSummary: The thyroid surgeon must have a thorough understanding of laryngeal neuroanatomy and be able to recognize symptoms of vocal fold paresis and paralysis. Neuropraxia may occur even with excellent surgical technique. Patients should be counseled appropriately, particularly if they are professional voice users. Preoperative or early postoperative changes in voice, swallowing, and airway function should prompt immediate referral to an otolaryngologist. Early recognition and treatment may avoid the development of complications and improve patient quality of life
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Add tag(s)
Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)

The thyroid surgeon must have a thorough understanding of laryngeal neuroanatomy and be able to recognize symptoms of vocal fold paresis and paralysis. Neuropraxia may occur even with excellent surgical technique. Patients should be counseled appropriately, particularly if they are professional voice users. Preoperative or early postoperative changes in voice, swallowing, and airway function should prompt immediate referral to an otolaryngologist. Early recognition and treatment may avoid the development of complications and improve patient quality of life

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha