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Radiochemotherapy for lung cancer in developing countries

In Clinical Oncology
By: Kepka L.
Contributor(s): Casas F | Jeremic B | Agarwal JP | Dawotola D | Gaye PM | Vashkevitch L | Saghatelyan T | Abdel-Wahab S | Perin B | .
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Vol 31 Issues 7.Publisher: 2009Description: 536-542.Subject(s): Radiotherapy | Lung cancer | Elderly | Developing countries | Combined treatment | Chemotherapy | DDC classification: Online resources: Click here to access online In: Clinical OncologySummary: Radiochemotherapy has become a standard approach in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer and limited disease small cell lung cancer. Most of the data supporting this observation come from the developed world and only extremely rarely have good-quality clinical trials been carried out in developing countries. It is therefore of paramount importance to put the experience of the developed world into the context of the limited resources and other health care problems of developing countries. In this overview, the problems with the implementation of such data are discussed. The necessity of carrying out clinical trials specifically designed to address the needs of developing countries is emphasised. The research on cheaper ways of radiochemotherapy combination should be encouraged. The specific national guidelines for local needs should be created and followed. The availability of radiotherapy equipment is of major importance, as radiotherapy has a pivotal role in non-surgical treatment of lung cancer, es
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Articles Articles Tata Memorial Hospital
(Browse shelf) Available AR9326

Radiochemotherapy has become a standard approach in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer and limited disease small cell lung cancer. Most of the data supporting this observation come from the developed world and only extremely rarely have good-quality clinical trials been carried out in developing countries. It is therefore of paramount importance to put the experience of the developed world into the context of the limited resources and other health care problems of developing countries. In this overview, the problems with the implementation of such data are discussed. The necessity of carrying out clinical trials specifically designed to address the needs of developing countries is emphasised. The research on cheaper ways of radiochemotherapy combination should be encouraged. The specific national guidelines for local needs should be created and followed. The availability of radiotherapy equipment is of major importance, as radiotherapy has a pivotal role in non-surgical treatment of lung cancer, es

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