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An evidence-based case of acoustic/vestibular schwannoma

In Indian Journal of Research Homoeopathy
Contributor(s): Pandey D | Gupta N | girishguptadr@gmail.com | Gupta G.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Vol 9 Issues 1.Publisher: 2015Description: 49-54.Subject(s): Acoustic neuroma/schwannoma, Homoeopathic medicine, Lycopodium, Intra cranial tumour | DDC classification: Online resources: Click here to access online In: Indian Journal of Research HomoeopathySummary: A vestibular schwannoma, often called an acoustic neuroma/schwannoma, is a benign primary intracranial tumor of the myelin-forming cells of the vestibulo-cochlear nerve (8 th cranial nerve). This tumor arises from the Schwann cells responsible for the myelin sheath that helps keep peripheral nerves insulated. [1] Approximately, 3000 cases are diagnosed each year in the United States with a prevalence of about 1 in 100,000 worldwide. It comprises 5-10% of all intracranial neoplasms in adults. Incidence peaks in the fifth and sixth decades and both sexes are affected equally. Studies in Denmark published in 2004 show the incidence of 17.4/million. Most acoustic neuromas are diagnosed in patients between the ages of 30 and 60, and men and women appear to be affected equally. [2] The case illustrated here is a rare one of acoustic/vestibular schwannoma a surgical conditions, treated with Lycopodium, which produced improvement on both subjective and objective parameters.
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A vestibular schwannoma, often called an acoustic neuroma/schwannoma, is a benign primary intracranial tumor of the myelin-forming cells of the vestibulo-cochlear nerve (8 th cranial nerve). This tumor arises from the Schwann cells responsible for the myelin sheath that helps keep peripheral nerves insulated. [1] Approximately, 3000 cases are diagnosed each year in the United States with a prevalence of about 1 in 100,000 worldwide. It comprises 5-10% of all intracranial neoplasms in adults. Incidence peaks in the fifth and sixth decades and both sexes are affected equally. Studies in Denmark published in 2004 show the incidence of 17.4/million. Most acoustic neuromas are diagnosed in patients between the ages of 30 and 60, and men and women appear to be affected equally. [2] The case illustrated here is a rare one of acoustic/vestibular schwannoma a surgical conditions, treated with Lycopodium, which produced improvement on both subjective and objective parameters.

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