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Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for interventional pain management in cancer pain

In Indian Journal of Palliative Care
By: Bhatnagar S.
Contributor(s): sushmabhatnagar1@gmail.com | Gupta M.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Issues: 2 Vol. 21. Publisher: 2015Description: 137-147.Subject(s): Superior hypogastric | Radiofrequency | Neurolytic | Lumbar sympathectomy | Intrathecal drug delivery system | Interventions | Guidelines | Evidence‑based | Epidural opioids | Celiac plexus block | Cancer pain In: Indian Journal of Palliative CareSummary: Intractable cancer pain not amenable to standard oral or parenteral analgesics is a horrifying truth in 1015% of patients. Interventional pain management techniques are an indispensable arsenal in pain physicians armamentarium for severe, intractable pain and can be broadly classified into neuroablative and neuromodulation techniques. An array of neurolytic techniques (chemical, thermal, or surgical) can be employed for ablation of individual nerve fibers, plexuses, or intrathecalneurolysis in patients with resistant pain and short life‑expectancy. Neuraxial administration of drugs and spinal cord stimulation to modulate or alter the pain perception constitutes the most frequently employed neuromodulation techniques. Lately, there is a rising call for early introduction of interventional techniques in carefully selected patients simultaneously or even before starting strong opioids. After decades of empirical use, it is the need of the hour to head towards professionalism and standardization in order to secure credibility of specialization and those practicing it. Even though the interventional management has found a definite place in cancer pain, there is a dearth of evidence‑based practice guidelines for interventional therapies in cancer pain. This may be because of paucity of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating their safety and efficacy in cancer pain. Laying standardized guidelines based on existing and emerging evidence will act as a foundation step towards strengthening, credentialing, and dissemination of the specialty of interventional cancer pain management. This will also ensure an improved decision‑making and quality of life (QoL) of the suffering patients
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Intractable cancer pain not amenable to standard oral or parenteral analgesics is a horrifying truth in 1015% of patients. Interventional pain management techniques are an indispensable arsenal in pain physicians armamentarium for severe, intractable pain and can be broadly classified into neuroablative and neuromodulation techniques. An array of neurolytic techniques (chemical, thermal, or surgical) can be employed for ablation of individual nerve fibers, plexuses, or intrathecalneurolysis in patients with resistant pain and short life‑expectancy. Neuraxial administration of drugs and spinal cord stimulation to modulate or alter the pain perception constitutes the most frequently employed neuromodulation techniques. Lately, there is a rising call for early introduction of interventional techniques in carefully selected patients simultaneously or even before starting strong opioids. After decades of empirical use, it is the need of the hour to head towards professionalism and standardization in order to secure credibility of specialization and those practicing it. Even though the interventional management has found a definite place in cancer pain, there is a dearth of evidence‑based practice guidelines for interventional therapies in cancer pain. This may be because of paucity of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating their safety and efficacy in cancer pain. Laying standardized guidelines based on existing and emerging evidence will act as a foundation step towards strengthening, credentialing, and dissemination of the specialty of interventional cancer pain management. This will also ensure an improved decision‑making and quality of life (QoL) of the suffering patients

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