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Applicability of 2008 World Health Organization Classification System of Hematolymphoid Neoplasms: Learning Experiences

In Indian Journal of Pathology & Microbiology
By: Modkharkar S.
Contributor(s): Navale P | Amare PK | Chougule A | Patkar N | Tembhare P | Menon H | Sengar M | Khattry N | Banavali S | Arora B | Narula G | Laskar S | Khanna N | Muckaden MA | Rangarajan V | Agrawal A | Shet T | Epari S | Subramanian PG | Gujral S [Corresponding author].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 2018Description: .Subject(s): Extranodal Lymphomas | World Health Organization classification | Hematolymphoid Neoplasms | Leukemia | Lymphoma | Pediatric Hematolymphoid Neoplasms In: Indian Journal of Pathology & MicrobiologySummary: Abstract BACKGROUND: 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of hematolymphoid neoplasms (HLN) has classified them based on morphology, results of various ancillary techniques, and clinical features.[1] There are no studies looking at the applicability of WHO classification. AIMS: The aim of the study was to calculate proportions of all HLN subtypes seen during 1-year period based on 2008 WHO classification of HLN and study applicability and also shortcomings of practices in a tertiary care center in India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a 1-year retrospective study (January 1st, to December 31st, 2010) where cases were identified using hospital/laboratory electronic records. Old follow-up and referral cases were excluded from the study. Only newly diagnosed cases classified into categories laid down by 2008 WHO classification of HLN included. RESULTS: Out of 2118 newly diagnosed classifiable cases, 1602 (75.6%) cases were of lymphoid neoplasms, 489 (23.1%) cases of myeloid neoplasms, 16 (0.8%) cases of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms, and 11 (0.5%) cases of acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage. Overall, most common HLN subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 361, 17.0%). Precursor B-lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma (n = 177, 48.2%) was the most common subtype within pediatric age group. CONCLUSIONS: All major subtypes of HLN were seen at our center and showed trends almost similar to those seen in other Indian studies. Molecular/cytogenetic studies could not be performed on a significant number of cases owing to logistic reasons (unavailability of complete panels and also cost-related issues) and such cases could not be classified as per the WHO classification system.
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Address for corresponding author : s_gujral@outlook.com

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of hematolymphoid neoplasms (HLN) has classified them based on morphology, results of various ancillary techniques, and clinical features.[1] There are no studies looking at the applicability of WHO classification.

AIMS:
The aim of the study was to calculate proportions of all HLN subtypes seen during 1-year period based on 2008 WHO classification of HLN and study applicability and also shortcomings of practices in a tertiary care center in India.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:
This was a 1-year retrospective study (January 1st, to December 31st, 2010) where cases were identified using hospital/laboratory electronic records. Old follow-up and referral cases were excluded from the study. Only newly diagnosed cases classified into categories laid down by 2008 WHO classification of HLN included.

RESULTS:
Out of 2118 newly diagnosed classifiable cases, 1602 (75.6%) cases were of lymphoid neoplasms, 489 (23.1%) cases of myeloid neoplasms, 16 (0.8%) cases of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms, and 11 (0.5%) cases of acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage. Overall, most common HLN subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 361, 17.0%). Precursor B-lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma (n = 177, 48.2%) was the most common subtype within pediatric age group.

CONCLUSIONS:
All major subtypes of HLN were seen at our center and showed trends almost similar to those seen in other Indian studies. Molecular/cytogenetic studies could not be performed on a significant number of cases owing to logistic reasons (unavailability of complete panels and also cost-related issues) and such cases could not be classified as per the WHO classification system.

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