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Docetaxel/Oxaliplatin/Capecitabine (TEX) triplet followed by continuation monotherapy in advanced gastric cancer

In Indian Journal of Cancer
By: Ostwal V.
Contributor(s): Bose S | Sirohi B | Poladia B | Sahu A | Bhargava P | Doshi V | Dusane R | Nashikkar C | Shrikhande SV | Ramaswamy A [Corresponding author].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 2018Description: .Subject(s): Continuation chemotherapy | TEX | Docetaxel | Downscaling | Palliative chemotherapy In: Indian Journal of CancerSummary: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Docetaxel/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (TEX) is a commonly used combination chemotherapeutic regimen in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Application strategies in routine clinical practice are reported in this study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients diagnosed with AGC, receiving biweekly TEX (docetaxel - 60 mg/m (2)-D1; oxaliplatin - 85 mg/m (2)-D1, and capecitabine 500-625 mg/m (2) orally twice daily for 14 days) between July 2012 and May 2016 were retrospectively analyzed for tolerance, prognostic factors, event-free survival (EFS), and overall survival (OS). The proportion of patients continuing and terminating chemotherapy at various time-points was enumerated. RESULTS: Overall, 208 patients were started on TEX. Median EFS was 6.34 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.80-6.87), and median OS was 15.31 (95% CI 12.65-17.96). Post 8 cycles of TEX, further 30 patients (14.4%) were continued on chemotherapy (docetaxel, capecitabine, or TEX) whereas 47 patients (22.6%) were on observation only, and there was a statistically significant difference in the median OS of these two groups (22.55 months vs. 14.89 months; P = 0.028). Raised serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) levels (>100 U/L) predicted inferior survival (P = 0.006). CONCLUSION: TEX chemotherapy is a feasible, efficacious triplet regimen that can be used in clinical practice. SAP levels >100 U/L is a poor prognostic factor, as observed in this study. An initial "induction" such as combination chemotherapy regimen followed by monotherapy as continuation requires further evaluation.
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Address for correspondence: anantr13@gmail.com

Abstract
INTRODUCTION:
Docetaxel/oxaliplatin/capecitabine (TEX) is a commonly used combination chemotherapeutic regimen in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Application strategies in routine clinical practice are reported in this study.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:
Patients diagnosed with AGC, receiving biweekly TEX (docetaxel - 60 mg/m (2)-D1; oxaliplatin - 85 mg/m (2)-D1, and capecitabine 500-625 mg/m (2) orally twice daily for 14 days) between July 2012 and May 2016 were retrospectively analyzed for tolerance, prognostic factors, event-free survival (EFS), and overall survival (OS). The proportion of patients continuing and terminating chemotherapy at various time-points was enumerated.

RESULTS:
Overall, 208 patients were started on TEX. Median EFS was 6.34 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.80-6.87), and median OS was 15.31 (95% CI 12.65-17.96). Post 8 cycles of TEX, further 30 patients (14.4%) were continued on chemotherapy (docetaxel, capecitabine, or TEX) whereas 47 patients (22.6%) were on observation only, and there was a statistically significant difference in the median OS of these two groups (22.55 months vs. 14.89 months; P = 0.028). Raised serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) levels (>100 U/L) predicted inferior survival (P = 0.006).

CONCLUSION:
TEX chemotherapy is a feasible, efficacious triplet regimen that can be used in clinical practice. SAP levels >100 U/L is a poor prognostic factor, as observed in this study. An initial "induction" such as combination chemotherapy regimen followed by monotherapy as continuation requires further evaluation.

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