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Antibiotic Lock Therapy for Salvage of Tunneled Central Venous Catheters with Catheter Colonization and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection.

In Transplant Infectious Disease
By: Zanwar S.
Contributor(s): Jain P | Gokarn A | Devadas SK | Punatar S | Khurana S | Bonda A | Pruthy R | Bhat V | Qureshi S | Khattry N [Corresponding author].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 2019Description: .Subject(s): Antibiotic lock | Hickman catheter | Catheter-related infections | Central venous catheter In: Transplant Infectious Disease Vol. 21, no. 1, p. e13017.Summary: Abstract Central Venous Catheters (CVCs) represent a significant source of infection in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and can add to the cost of care, morbidity, and mortality. Organisms forming biofilms on the inner surface of catheters require a much higher local antibiotic concentration to clear the pathogen growth. Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) represents one such strategy to achieve such high intraluminal concentrations of antibiotics and can facilitate catheter salvage. Patients with catheter colonization (CC) or hemodynamically stable catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) received ALT per institutional policy. We analyzed the incidence of CC and CRBSI and salvage rate of tunneled CVCs (Hickman) with ALT in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant in this retrospective study. Catheter Colonization was noted in 9.8% and CRBSI in 10.7% patients. Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) accounted for 45% and 83% of isolates in CC and CRBSI, respectively. In patients with CRBSI, the rate of catheter salvage with use of ALT in addition to systemic antibiotics was 86% compared to 55% in patients with systemic antibiotics use only (p=0.06). There was no CRBSI related mortality, and no increase in resistant strains was noted at subsequent CRBSI. In conclusion, ALT represents an important strategy for catheter salvage, especially for gram-negative infections, in a carefully selected patient population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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Address for correspondence: nkhattry@gmail.com

Abstract
Central Venous Catheters (CVCs) represent a significant source of infection in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and can add to the cost of care, morbidity, and mortality. Organisms forming biofilms on the inner surface of catheters require a much higher local antibiotic concentration to clear the pathogen growth. Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) represents one such strategy to achieve such high intraluminal concentrations of antibiotics and can facilitate catheter salvage. Patients with catheter colonization (CC) or hemodynamically stable catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) received ALT per institutional policy. We analyzed the incidence of CC and CRBSI and salvage rate of tunneled CVCs (Hickman) with ALT in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant in this retrospective study. Catheter Colonization was noted in 9.8% and CRBSI in 10.7% patients. Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) accounted for 45% and 83% of isolates in CC and CRBSI, respectively. In patients with CRBSI, the rate of catheter salvage with use of ALT in addition to systemic antibiotics was 86% compared to 55% in patients with systemic antibiotics use only (p=0.06). There was no CRBSI related mortality, and no increase in resistant strains was noted at subsequent CRBSI. In conclusion, ALT represents an important strategy for catheter salvage, especially for gram-negative infections, in a carefully selected patient population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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