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18F-FDG PET/CT: normal variants, artifacts and pitfalls in lung cancer

In Agrawal, A., Rangarajan, V. PET/CT in lung cancer: clinician's guide to radionuclide hybrid imaging. Cham, Springer. p. 61-74
By: Agrawal, A.
Contributor(s): Rangarajan, V.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: Cham Springer 2018Description: p. 61-74.ISBN: 978-3-319-72660-1.Subject(s): 18F-FDG PET/CT | Lung cancer | Thoracic neoplasm In: Agrawal, A., Rangarajan, V. PET/CT in lung cancer: clinician's guide to radionuclide hybrid imaging. Cham, Springer. p. 61-74Summary: 18F-2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) is the workhorse of oncological PET/CT departments. Its role in staging, restaging, and response assessment of various cancers is already established. But FDG is a marker of glycolysis and, thus, is neither specific for malignancy nor for a particular tumor. Its accumulation can be seen in benign process which may be difficult to differentiate from a neoplastic etiology. It is imperative that nuclear physicians and radiologists know about these FDG-avid benign pathologies and few FDG-negative malignant etiologies, which may confound correct interpretation in PET/CT reporting.
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Agrawal, A., Rangarajan, V. (2018). 18F-FDG PET/CT: Normal Variants, Artifacts, and Pitfalls in Lung Cancer. In A. Agrawal & V. Rangarajan (Eds.), PET/CT in Lung Cancer: Clinicians’ guides to radionuclide hybrid imaging. Cham: Springer. pp 61-74. ISBN: 978-3-319-72660-1

18F-2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) is the workhorse of oncological PET/CT departments. Its role in staging, restaging, and response assessment of various cancers is already established. But FDG is a marker of glycolysis and, thus, is neither specific for malignancy nor for a particular tumor. Its accumulation can be seen in benign process which may be difficult to differentiate from a neoplastic etiology. It is imperative that nuclear physicians and radiologists know about these FDG-avid benign pathologies and few FDG-negative malignant etiologies, which may confound correct interpretation in PET/CT reporting.

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