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Characterization of therapy-related acute leukemia in hereditary breast-ovarian carcinoma patients: role of BRCA1 mutation and topoisomerase II-directed therapy.

In Medical Oncology.
By: Bagal B.
Contributor(s): Kumar R | Gaur T | Talreja V | Bonda A | Patkar N | Shetty D | Kowtal P | Subramanian PG | Gupta S | Sarin R | Hasan SK [Corresponding author].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 2020Description: .Subject(s): Breast cancer | Germline BRCA1 | Therapy-related leukemia | Topoisomerase II In: Medical Oncology Vol. 37, no. 5, p. 48.Summary: Therapy-related acute leukemias (t-ALs) represent approximately 10-20% of all acute leukemias, are frequently resistant to chemotherapy, and are associated with guarded outcomes. The national comprehensive cancer network data suggest that t-AL cases are diagnosed at increasing rates in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapeutic agents targeting topoisomerase II. Two cases of BRCA1-mutated ovarian and breast carcinoma who developed therapy-related APL and ALL, respectively, following topoisomerase II-directed therapy were characterized. Genomic characterization of therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukemia (t-APL) revealed a unique RARA intron 2 breakpoint (Chr17: 40347487) at 3'-end of RARA corroborating breakpoint clustering in t-APL following topoisomerase II inhibition. Both cases of this series harbored germline BRCA1 mutations. The germline BRCA1 mutation in patient with t-APL was detected in exon 8 (HGVS nucleotide: c.512dupT). This mutation in t-APL is extremely rare. Interestingly, t-ALL patient in this series had a BRCA1 mutation (HGVS nucleotide: c.68_69delAG; BIC designation: 187delAG) identical to a previously reported case after the treatment of same primary disease. It is unlikely that two breast cancer patients with identical BRCA1 mutation receiving topoisomerase II-targeted agents for the primary disease developed t-AL by chance. This report highlights the development of t-AL in BRAC1-mutated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients and warrants further studies on functional consequences of topoisomerase inhibition in this setting.
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Address for correspondence: shasan@actrec.gov.in

Therapy-related acute leukemias (t-ALs) represent approximately 10-20% of all acute leukemias, are frequently resistant to chemotherapy, and are associated with guarded outcomes. The national comprehensive cancer network data suggest that t-AL cases are diagnosed at increasing rates in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapeutic agents targeting topoisomerase II. Two cases of BRCA1-mutated ovarian and breast carcinoma who developed therapy-related APL and ALL, respectively, following topoisomerase II-directed therapy were characterized. Genomic characterization of therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukemia (t-APL) revealed a unique RARA intron 2 breakpoint (Chr17: 40347487) at 3'-end of RARA corroborating breakpoint clustering in t-APL following topoisomerase II inhibition. Both cases of this series harbored germline BRCA1 mutations. The germline BRCA1 mutation in patient with t-APL was detected in exon 8 (HGVS nucleotide: c.512dupT). This mutation in t-APL is extremely rare. Interestingly, t-ALL patient in this series had a BRCA1 mutation (HGVS nucleotide: c.68_69delAG; BIC designation: 187delAG) identical to a previously reported case after the treatment of same primary disease. It is unlikely that two breast cancer patients with identical BRCA1 mutation receiving topoisomerase II-targeted agents for the primary disease developed t-AL by chance. This report highlights the development of t-AL in BRAC1-mutated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients and warrants further studies on functional consequences of topoisomerase inhibition in this setting.

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